Applying the Business Model Ontology Modules

you can select the relevant modules in following file:

BlaBlaCar

BlaBlaCar on the one hand intermediates between a driver (provider) and passengers (customers) for an offline service (ridesharing), and the service only happens once for each listing. The price is set by the provider based on quantity (number of persons). The payments are transferred by an external payment system and the revenue stream is a commission of the booking price paid by the customer. The conversation system allows both conversations with messages before (listing conversation) and after (booking conversation) the booking. After the delivery of the service, both a review by the provider and by the customer towards each other are allowed.

couchsurfing

Couchsurfing on the other hand intermediates between a houseowner (provider) and lodgers (customers) for an offline service (free stay), while the service can reoccur multiple times for one listing. There is no price setting, and the revenue is gathered using a subscription fee for all users by an external payment system. The conversation system allows both conversations with messages before (listing conversation) and after (booking conversation) the booking. After the delivery of the service, both a review by the provider and by the customer towards each other are allowed.

         To develop an organization-specific ontology for an envisioned or existing sharing platform, the modeler needs to follow a number of steps:

  1. Download Visual Paradigm Community Edition and download the latest version of the OntoUML plugin (You can find more info on how to install the OntoUML plugin here: https://github.com/OntoUML/ontouml-vp-plugin)

2. Download the latest version of the extended DPO on https://model-a-platform.com/ontology-versions/ and open it with Visual Paradigm Community Edition. All ontology modules (original and BM) can be visualised within the class diagrams.

3. Create a new class diagram for your organization-specific ontology and copy and paste the BM agnostic sharing platform ontology (figure 4) in this newly created class diagram.

4. The classes of each BM module are gathered in a separate package visualized in the class repository of Visual Paradigm. These BM module packages are again grouped within their property as summarized in table 2 and 3. Go through each relevant module from top to down, and drag and drop the classes into the newly created class diagram. Automatically the color indicating the UFO stereotype, relationships between the classes and their multiplicities are visualized, with the BM module name of each class between brackets.

5. Classes not relevant to the modeler’s purpose can be deleted, and a subclass can be placed over a parent class when the subclass better defines the relationships and constraints needed to model the envisioned shared platform.

6. It is in the liberty of the modeler to create new classes and relationships to capture the platform-specific knowledge and required functionality of the platform he or she wants to model. The modeler has the freedom to tailor-make his model depending on its purpose, and after a newly created class is dropped into the organization-specific ontology, it is possible to select a suggested UFO stereotype to visualize the OntoUML color codes.

7. Attributes can be added to each class to visualize the platform-specific information it needs to capture. Also, when a class is only connected to one other class with a 1 to 1 relationship, it is allowed to capture this class as attribute instead to simplify the model.